Family Owned Since 1979
Cultivating Gardeners

MARSHALL

MARSHALL

Product Description:

(June bearing) A strawberry so delicious it was given as a gift to Kings and Queens and dubbed the “Finest eating strawberry in all of America.” Marshall strawberry has been resurrected from relative obscurity, and we are very honored to offer it—ready to once again grace our gardens with its juicy, sweet flavor. Discovered in a Massachusetts garden over 125 years ago, Marshall was so prized that Pioneers carried it across the continent. It found a home in the Northwest, thriving and eventually becoming the signature taste Washington and Oregon’s entire frozen fruit industry was built on. And then disaster struck. In the 1940’s diseases imported across the ocean effectively wiped Marshall out of production. The only surviving plants went into hiding in a select few isolated gardens. Decades later and Marshall had become a myth, a legend gardeners told each other over trowels. Then in 2004 something beautiful happened, Marshall was rediscovered and put on the endangered food list. Through careful cultivation the plant is back in circulation and is once again beloved by foodies, chefs, and flavor connoisseurs everywhere. Despite its knockout success and hordes of adoring fans, Marshall will never again be a major food production icon. Like our cherished heirloom tomatoes, the fruit is too fragile to ship to stores or markets. But with love and care, Marshall can once again be the treasure of any home garden. Hardy in zones 5-9. 

Marshall plants are shipped in either mid-April or mid-May in 3 ½ inch pots. Order early for best availability. Detailed planting information and growing instructions are included with each order. Not available to US Territories or Canada.
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PLANT

$24.95

$24.95

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Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
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G
Gene B.
Marshalls

Received 2 healthy plants this spring. After a bit of hardening them off, (we had a cold wet start to the season) I transplanted them to hanging baskets to keep the pests off them. They produced a couple berries which were wonderful BTW, and are now sending out runners which I will use to propagate. The taste brought me back to my youth on Bainbridge Island, WA where the Marshals a mainstay of the booming strawberry industry. We even had a cannery for all the berries the local farms produced.

M
Mike G.#.
too soon to tell

Received 2 plants and 1 was a little 'lame'. Planted them both and the lame one did not take. The other plant took off and is doing well. I pinched off the 1 or 2 flowers that bloomed so obviously no berries to taste. The plant has done well so far and in the last couple of weeks has produced 2 runners that I'll be rooting (hopefully today). Ask me again next year. I have faith in the plant so I'll give you guys 4 stars and a 5th when I get some berries to taste.

L
Lynne E.
Doing Fine in Aerogarden

The o Territorial Seeds advertising persuaded me to order two Marshall strawberry plants. When they arrived, I realized that I had no good place for growing them outdoors. So I washed the soil off the roots, and "transplanted" them to a Bounty Aerogarden. They are doing famously--growing leaves, opening buds, and ripening strawberries. The little berries taste great!

This is clearly an "off label" use of the Marshall strawberry plants, but it is a testimonial to the quality and health of the Territorial Seeds product!

O
Ohio S.
Very healthy plants in 2023 - - 2024 should give us some berries

Received very healthy plants in spring 2023. Took us while to decide on a place for them. Planted them in a raised bed, then planted carrots around them. Carrots and strawberry plants were happy together. In the fall we planted garlic among the plants - mostly bc a rodent (vole?) decided our other strawberry patch in a different raised bed was excellent place to live, and I heard garlic is a deterrent to voles and they play nice with strawberries. So far, the plants look good this winter (Ohio zone 6a), and looking forward to spring growth.

Soil Temp for Germ 65–75°F
Seed Depth Press into soil lightly
Days to Emergence 2–6 wks
Plant Spacing 8–12"
Fertilizer Needs Medium
Minimum Germination 60%
Seeds per Gram Listed per variety
Seed Life 2 years

Fragaria vesca

Culture
• Strawberries require fertile, well-drained soil, high in organic matter, with an optimum soil pH of 5.5-6.5
• Prepare beds by deeply digging in a 1 inch layer of compost and 5 pounds of bone meal for 100 square feet
• Plant in raised beds, and cover with plastic or straw mulch to prevent fruit contact with soil, which can cause rot
• Keep beds evenly moist, use drip irrigation if possible, avoid wetting fruit; plants need 1-1 1/2 inches of water per week during the growing season
• Pinch off runners to keep plants productive
• June bearing: Produce berries over a 2-3 week period in early summer
• Everbearing: Produce berries consistently from late spring through fall

Direct Sowing
• Direct seed outside as soon as the soil warms

Transplanting
• Sow indoors 2 months before last frost date
• Strawberry seeds need light to germinate
• Keep moist with a mister
• Up-pot at 3-4 weeks and transplant outside after the danger of frost has passed

Insects & Diseases
• Common pests: Root weevils, aphids, and slugs
• Pest control: Neem oil or Pyrethrin, and baits or traps for slugs
• Common diseases: Mold, mildew, root rot and verticilium wilt
• Disease control: Rotate every 3-4 years with new plants, Greencure®



Strawberry Plants

Fragaria x ananassa

Culture
• Strawberries require fertile, well-drained soil, high in organic matter, with an optimum soil pH of 5.5-6.5
• Prepare beds by deeply digging in a 1 inch layer of compost and 5 pounds of bone meal for 100 square feet
• Plant in raised beds, and cover with plastic or straw mulch to prevent fruit contact with soil, which can cause rot
• Keep beds evenly moist, use drip irrigation if possible, avoid wetting fruit; plants need 1-1 1/2 inches of water per week during the growing season
• Plant 12-15 inches apart in all directions
• Pinch off runners to keep plants productive
• June bearing: Produce berries over a 2-3 week period in early summer
• Everbearing/Day Neutral: Produce berries consistently from late spring through fall

Planting
• Plant in 4 inch pots and hold for a few weeks if soil is not ready when you receive plants
• Dig in 1/4 cup complete fertilizer per plant
• Pinch off blossoms of everbearing varieties until July 1st of the first year
• Pinch off blossoms of June bearing varieties the entire first year

Insects & Diseases
• Common pests: Root weevils, aphids, and slugs
• Pest control: Neem oil or Pyrethrin, and baits or traps for slugs
• Common diseases: Mold, mildew, root rot and verticilium wilt
• Disease control: Rotate every 3-4 years with new plants, Greencure®

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