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Potato Growing Guide
Potato Growing Guide
Seed Depth Eyes per Piece Seed Spacing Row Spacing
4-6" 3 12" 24-36"

Solanum tuberosum Our favorite comfort food has proven to be an amazing source of nutrients and nourishment. High in vitamins, such as vitamin C, they rival broccoli as a source of phytonutrients. We offer only certified organic and disease-free seed potatoes. Easy to grow, we will include complete cultural directions with each order.

Days to maturity are calculated from date of direct seeding.

Culture
• Potatoes prefer fertile, loose, well-drained soil
• Forking beds is recommended
• Apply a fertilizer that is low in nitrogen and high in phosphorus such as bone meal — use 5-7 pounds per 100 square feet
• Proper soil pH of 5.2-6.0 will help avoid scab
• Irrigate thoroughly when needed, allow the soil to dry out somewhat before watering again
Hilling: as plants grow, cover with soil, mulch, or compost, while leaving top-growth exposed
• Repeat hilling process 3-4 times throughout season

Direct Sowing
• Plant potatoes up to 3 weeks before your last frost date
• Larger potatoes can be cut into smaller pieces to use as seed — allow the cut potato to heal before planting to prevent rot (2-3 days at 70°F)

Insects & Diseases
• Common insects: Colorado potato beetle, tuber flea beetle, potato aphid, potato psyllid, potato tuber worm/moth
• Insect control: Pyrethrin and row covers
• Common diseases: Early and late blight, white mold, botrytis, leaf roll virus, mosaic virus, verticilium wilt, potato scab
• Disease prevention: 4-year crop rotation, and fungicide applications

Harvest & Storage
• "New" potatoes can be harvested from early varieties beginning 60 days after planting
• Once top-growth dies down, leave in the ground for 2 weeks and then harvest
• Dig tubers carefully, brush off soil and allow skins to dry before storing
• Standard potatoes yield about 10 times the amount originally planted
• Fingerling potatoes yield 15-20 times the amount originally planted
• Store in a dark location; 40-45°F and 90% relative humidity

 

Sweet Potato Growing Guide
Soil Temp. Row Spacing Spacing Fertilizer Needs
65°F 12-24" 16-18" Medium

Ipomoea batatas Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A. Although sweet potatoes and yams look alike, the yam is from a subtropical shrub that is native to Africa, while the sweet potato is from the American morning glory family.

Days to maturity are calculated from date of planting.

Culture
• Sweet potatoes should be planted in the garden when the weather has stabilized in late spring and nighttime temperatures are above 60°F
• The use of low tunnels or cold frames is highly recommended in cooler climates and northern states with shorter seasons
• Rototill or fork in a 2 inch thick layer of compost and bone meal — use 5-7 pounds per 100 square feet
• Create 6-8 inch high raised beds
• Soil should be adequately draining; water thoroughly every 7-10 days
• Sweet potatoes require up to 1 inch of water per week throughout the season

Transplanting
• Plant slips deeply into raised beds, up to top leaves
• Live plants should be planted even with the soil
• Keep evenly moist until you see new growth
• If the soil temperature is less than 65°F, plant slips in 3-4 inch pots and keep them in a warm location until you can plant outside

Insects & Diseases
• Common insects: Usually pest free
• Common diseases: Scurf
• Disease prevention: Remove all plant debris after harvest and practice 3-4 year crop rotation

Harvest & Storage
• Harvest prior to first frost after the weather cools in the fall
• To cure, brush off the soil and place the sweet potatoes in a warm, dry area (80-85°F and 80-90% relative humidity) for 7-14 days
• After curing, handle carefully and store them at 50-60°F

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