BOURDEAUX

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BOURDEAUX

Product Description:

Anemone coronaria An exquisite plant for landscapes, woodland border plantings rock gardens and containers, anemone are charming, late spring blooms in rich mulberry. Low-growing, ferny foliage adds textural interest to plantings, and the 12 inch tall flowers are also sweet in fresh cut arrangements. Deer resistant. Lift bulbs in autumn in zones cooler than 7 and re-plant in spring. Hardy in zones 7-10.

Bulbs start shipping mid February. Available only within the contiguous US.
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BULB

$19.95
$19.95
  • Key Features:

Hardiness Zone 7-10

General
Soak anemone corms in tepid water for 3-4 hours prior to planting. As the corms soak, they will begin to plump. Don’t over soak the corms, or they could rot. In Zones 4 and above, they can be planted throughout the spring. In Zones 2 and 3, anemone should be planted outside after all danger of frost has passed. For an earlier start, plant the bulbs indoors in a pot using a standard potting soil. Water well and keep the pot in a sunny window. Place outdoors after the danger of frost has passed. Plant bulbs with the rounded side facing upwards (pointed end down). Starting the anemone indoors could mean the plants bloom a few weeks early.

Spacing
Plant bulbs 2 inches below the soil surface and space them approximately 4-6 inches apart.

Soil Requirements
Anemone prefer a rich, well-drained soil. Amend the soil with a thick layer of composted organic matter dug in to the top 6-8 inches of ground.

Light Requirements
Plant in full sun, or in regions with hot summers, plant in partial shade.

Fertilization Requirements
For best results, fertilize monthly with an all-purpose fertilizer.

Cutting Flowers
Anemone blooms have a very long vase life. Harvest the flowers as soon as the buds break. Add floral food to the vase water. Keep the plants dead-headed to maximize the bloom time.

End of Season Care
In Zones 7 and above, leave anemone in the ground and cover with a protective layer of mulch. Leave the foliage on the plants to help nourish the bulbs. In Zones 6 and below, dig the bulbs before the first frost and let them air dry for several days. Store bulbs in peat moss in a cool, dry location. If you are unsure about overwintering the corms in the ground, the safe bet is to dig them up and store them until spring.